Featured Cases

New, popular, or otherwise notable cases are selected as featured cases on the Electronic Hallway. Browsing featured cases is a great way to begin if you are new to the Electronic Hallway or if you would like to see a sample of the breadth and depth of our case library.

This case is offered as part of the Recovery Act Case Program and serves as a best example of the efforts of the large network of federal, state, local, non-profit, and private sector partners who contributed in the implementation of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

This case is offered as part of the Recovery Act Case Program and serves as a best example of the efforts of the large network of federal, state, local, non-profit, and private sector partners who contributed in the implementation of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

This case is offered as part of the Recovery Act Case Program and serves as a best example of the efforts of the large network of federal, state, local, non-profit, and private sector partners who contributed in the implementation of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Due to large file size, please contact hallhelp@uw.edu to request Attachment 4.

This teaching note characterizes op-eds and discusses a few challenging aspects about initiating op-ed writing such as how to prompt student writers to go beyond a topic to determine a specific issue and finally forge a statement of purpose. This note offers one way for academics to introduce student writers to a prevalent genre in the field of public policy.

Communication
Teaching/Usage Note

Through this simulation students will experience the policymaking and implementation process firsthand. “Wolf Politics” is intended for use in a public policy- or environmental policy-oriented course. This experience will reinforce the concepts students have learned in their courses, allowing them to apply theoretical knowledge to a real policy issue. The process of preparing testimony for a U.S. Senate subcommittee also gives students a glimpse of how a Senate hearing may operate.

This case is bound to generate discussion and easily teach many lessons about clear managerial thinking, prioritization, and implementation of difficult solutions. Focusing on an unpleasant layoff situation containing management missteps and fears of a lawsuit, this case is particularly good for teaching leaders to develop decision criteria and matching strategies that combine responsibilities to clients and other employees along with obligations of fairness.

Teaching/Usage Note

This A and B case sequence traces the development of a nonprofit organization aimed at serving recent Hispanic immigrants in gaining access to day labor and staying out of immigration trouble. Resented in the neighborhood where their job seeking informally took root, the case sequence describes how the Executive Director and key board members worked through internal and external barriers in order to reduce the opposition and establish a presence in this rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of Seattle.

Summary: Basic Health is a state-sponsored program providing health insurance coverage to low-income families in Washington state. Because of significant state revenue shortfalls, the state legislature reduced Basic Health’s funding for the 2009–11 biennium by 43 percent. The administrator of the agency overseeing Basic Health was given wide latitude to decide the criteria by which 40,000 people would be removed from the program in order to balance the reduced budget.

Teaching/Usage Note

In January 2010 controversy erupted in the small city of Central Falls, Rhode Island, after state education officials identified the local high school as in need of overhaul due to the low level of achievement of its students. According to new guidelines established by the federal Department of Education under President Obama’s “Race to the Top” initiative, the Central Falls School District could choose among four “turn-around models” for addressing management, curriculum, and instructional concerns at the high school.

Teaching/Usage Note

This "Innovations in State and Local Government" case begins in January 1983, when Ellen Schall is appointed commissioner of New York City's Department of Juvenile Justice, an agency in upheaval. DJJ was established to detain seven- to fifteen-year-old children between arrest and adjudication. Most of DJJ's charges are held in a 25 year old secure detention facility called "Spofford," a notoriously violent and dilapidated facility in the South Bronx. The case describes the situation as Schall walks into it.