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Found 41 cases in the category Advocacy/Lobbying

  1. This case provides opportunities for students to map internal and external actors influencing policy decisions, evaluate the effectiveness of different approaches to advocacy, and think about how a specific organization might maximize its impact in the future. The case contains substantial background information on the global financial architecture (including institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund) and specific detail on the politics of the debt relief debate that took place between 1995 and 2000.

    Advocacy, Decision Making
  2. This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

  3. Over the past decade, immigrant rights organizations in several states seized the opportunity to shift their advocacy efforts from a narrow focus on reform of the nation’s immigration laws to a broader platform of improved immigrant integration into American society. This meant an expansion of policy focus into all aspects of immigrant life, including education, health care, and employment opportunities. To accomplish this, immigrant rights organizations had to devise new strategies to advocate for change at the level of state government.

  4. This case can be used to help students learn about the politics of tax initiatives as a tool for funding important community projects.

  5. This case demonstrates most clearly the challenges to starting and sustaining a collaborative partnership. By examining the different steps that the Eight Neighbors partnership has taken between September 2008 and August 2010, this case also highlights the potential benefits and challenges to tackling community-wide issues with an approach that involves different sectors and a diverse set of stakeholders.

  6. Dr. Albert Viau has developed a national physician’s assistant program to help solve the problem of rural health service delivery in Republica, a mountainous Central American country. This program would provide high level preventative and primary care in the rural and underserved areas of the country. His proposed solution faces major opposition from his medical colleagues and the health establishment. Dr. Viau knew the proven policy would help alleviate the problem, but he could not find any support. He ran for Dean of the Medical School to begin the reform and did not succeed.

  7. This teaching note characterizes op-eds and discusses a few challenging aspects about initiating op-ed writing such as how to prompt student writers to go beyond a topic to determine a specific issue and finally forge a statement of purpose. This note offers one way for academics to introduce student writers to a prevalent genre in the field of public policy.

    Communication
  8. Through this simulation students will experience the policymaking and implementation process firsthand. “Wolf Politics” is intended for use in a public policy- or environmental policy-oriented course. This experience will reinforce the concepts students have learned in their courses, allowing them to apply theoretical knowledge to a real policy issue. The process of preparing testimony for a U.S. Senate subcommittee also gives students a glimpse of how a Senate hearing may operate.

  9. Julie Stewart and her colleagues mobilize the angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws. Under these laws, even first-time, non-violent offenders receive extensive prison sentences. The organization brings diverse interests together to change both federal policy and state statutes. Stewart and her colleagues use the following strategies:

  10. This case traces the efforts of a variety of individuals, in and out of government, to solve the lead poisoning problem in New York City. The A Case explains the problem of lead poisoning in urban areas and outlines the efforts of activists to force the New York City government to address the issue. The case concludes with the 1969 appointment of Gordon Chase as health services administrator and Mayor John Lindsay's declaration that solving the problem would be a high priority for the city.