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Found 90 cases in the category Collaboration, Networks, and Partnerships

  1. Bicycling and Coast City is a comprehensive case study based upon a fictionalized city on the central coast of a Western state. Following a string of cyclist injuries and casualties along the bustling central corridor of Coast City, city leaders decide that action must be taken to improve the safety and mobility of local cyclists. Part A of the case begins with background information and problem definition, setting the backdrop with vivid detail of Coast City and its various stakeholders and political conflicts.

  2. This case challenges students to penetrate the complexities of metropolitan governance. Sound Transit, an entity newly created by voter mandate, must organize a seamless, one-ticket system across the boundaries of four established transit agencies in order to launch regional transportation service on time.

  3. On a Tuesday evening in April 2010, South Park residents and local business owners gathered at the local Machinists Union Hall to hear King County representatives make a surprising and disheartening announcement: the South Park Bridge would close. The bridge was the main link between the largely low-income and industrial neighborhood of South Park and downtown Seattle, and supported traffic flow onto the main retail corridor in South Park. This traffic provided much of the customer base on which the small businesses depended almost entirely.

  4. In March 2015, Newpoint High School, one of the high-performing charter schools in Escambia County, Florida, suddenly found itself at the heart of a real scandal when the School District announced publically that it appeared there was a possibility that school administrators had pressured teachers to falsify attendance records, delete overdue assignments, give answers to tests, and change grades in order to ensure that Newpoint seniors would advance to graduation. And the suggestion was that this was only the tip of the iceberg.

  5. Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investment to the area. The SCORE project dams have been qualified as sustainable by the International Hydropower Association’s (IHA) Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Forum, and construction on the Murum Dam, the third of a potential 12 dams, was completed in 2013.

  6. This case evaluates the premade decision of the Kigali City Council (KCC) to incorporate urban agriculture into the city’s long-term development agenda, as the key tool to address the problem of food security. A land-scarce country characterized by a predominantly rural population, Rwanda has a history of unsustainable approaches to food security, exacerbated by the collapse of the coffee industry in the 1980s and the genocide in the 1990s. After the genocide, international donors swept in to rebuild the war-torn country, which included projects designed to combat food insecurity.

  7. A shrinking Detroit and an expanding Guangzhou shape this case, which aims to introduce readers to the nuances of population density and the importance of redensification in sustainable urban planning. Redensification policies in these cities offer a novel way of thinking about how to distribute populations and jobs to optimize public services and a city’s quality of life.

  8. Creating an environment for sustainable growth in a boomtown has been unsuccessful throughout history. Oil companies—big and small—dedicate a tremendous amount of resources to the extraction process and are beholden to shareholders that want to see returns on their investment. As a result, though unemployment is much lower temporarily, only meager investments are made in the local community, which could be left with nothing when the oil runs out or global energy prices drop.

  9. SOTRA was created at the request of the Ivorian government on December 16, 1960 with a public-private concession agreement shortly after Côte d'Ivoire’s independence from France. It is the only organized and formal public transport company serving Cote d’Ivoire’s industrial center, Abidjan, with its network of large buses and water buses which primarily provide ‘urban service’ and cross-lagoon transit.

  10. Baltimore has suffered significant amounts of economic damage since the end of World War II and de-industrialization: high unemployment, an exodus of residents to the suburbs, alarming homicide and drug addiction rates, and plummeting educational achievement by residents. To reverse the decline, city leaders have pursued an aggressive policy of redeveloping waterfront real estate for high-end commercial and residential use.