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Found 28 cases in the category Program Evaluation

  1. This case is designed to illustrate the difficulties of working to improve customer service in a resource-challenged setting with little or no formal authority. Additionally, the case provides examples of historical data and continuous quality improvement (CQI) implementation that could or could not benefit those it was intended to serve.

    Decision Making, Program Evaluation
  2. This teaching case explores how diversity issues ranging from race and ethnicity to religion and culture span the domain of public leadership. Students are asked to step into the shoes of employment services trainer Alice Rhodes, identify problems in a job training program she is offering to residents of a public housing community, and respond to some of the challenges she faces in meeting her contracted goals.

  3. Instructors may use this case to teach operations analysis, and demonstrate the use of "continuous improvement" or "work re-engineering," inclusive decision-making and strategic organizational development. This case is ideal for provoking classroom discussion about the risks associated with different problem solving strategies from the perspective of the chief executive, about work flow systems and identifying moments of key customer contact ("moments of truth").

  4. This two part case and its companion bring real world problems into the study of statistics, research design, and communication with non-statistician audiences. Each case invokes multiple skill sets, aiding students in consolidating their knowledge. The brief texts are accompanied by ample data and extensive questions that instructors can use flexibly to combine class discussion, small group work, and writing assignments.

  5. The five mini-cases on ethics in managerial decision-making are intended to portray real life managerial dilemmas in a way that will help students develop frameworks for addressing those dilemmas.

  6. Everyone’s life has been touched by experience with a library. That familiarity allows a quick and vivid understanding of the value of the service and what must be managed and decided to ensure the quality of service. At the same time, the King County Library System in the case displays classic tensions between customer service priorities and the needs in a service delivery system to have standardized policies and effective resource allocation.

  7. The California Bureau of Public Lands is responsible for the management of all state-owned lands. It contracts with private timber companies to harvest timber. As part of the Program Analysis team, Gil Silver is designated to review the Bureau’s contract with a major timber company— Thompson Timber Co.—after intense opposition from small lumber companies and farm, labor and conservation groups. These groups claim the Bureau gives preferential treatment to big companies who ignore conservation requirements.

  8. Wyandotte County, Kansas consistently ranks near the bottom in health outcomes in the state. It is also one of the state’s poorest, most diverse counties. The County has made some important economic strides recently, and its government has begun to take an increasingly active role in trying to improve health. This case offers a detailed description of the County, its residents, their health outcomes, the health care system, and how health reform could change the landscape.

  9. This case focuses on Monty Paradis, a manager charged with overseeing farm worker health and safety, who discovers surprising results in the data he has about a state regulatory program called the Eyes and Falls initiative. This data dispel his previous assumptions, and other results that leave him with more questions than answers. In an effort to rigorously analyze the data on this initiative, he employed regression analysis to determine whether the initiative showed a relative decrease in injuries and costs.

  10. During her lunch break, Eileen Shanahan, assistant secretary for public affairs at the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW), learns that the first annual report of HEWs inspector general, due to be published the next day, will claim that HEW "wastes seven billion dollars a year." The bearer of this news is Robert Wilson, public affairs manager for the inspector general's office.