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Found 54 cases in the category Advocacy

  1. On a Tuesday evening in April 2010, South Park residents and local business owners gathered at the local Machinists Union Hall to hear King County representatives make a surprising and disheartening announcement: the South Park Bridge would close. The bridge was the main link between the largely low-income and industrial neighborhood of South Park and downtown Seattle, and supported traffic flow onto the main retail corridor in South Park. This traffic provided much of the customer base on which the small businesses depended almost entirely.

  2. This case provides opportunities for students to map internal and external actors influencing policy decisions, evaluate the effectiveness of different approaches to advocacy, and think about how a specific organization might maximize its impact in the future. The case contains substantial background information on the global financial architecture (including institutions such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund) and specific detail on the politics of the debt relief debate that took place between 1995 and 2000.

    Advocacy, Decision Making
  3. This two-day simulation focuses on the negotiation of controversial and complex issues related to the 2,000-mile border that separates and joins the United States and Mexico as neighbors.

  4. Over the past decade, immigrant rights organizations in several states seized the opportunity to shift their advocacy efforts from a narrow focus on reform of the nation’s immigration laws to a broader platform of improved immigrant integration into American society. This meant an expansion of policy focus into all aspects of immigrant life, including education, health care, and employment opportunities. To accomplish this, immigrant rights organizations had to devise new strategies to advocate for change at the level of state government.

  5. This case can be used to help students learn about the politics of tax initiatives as a tool for funding important community projects.

  6. Dr. Albert Viau has developed a national physician’s assistant program to help solve the problem of rural health service delivery in Republica, a mountainous Central American country. This program would provide high level preventative and primary care in the rural and underserved areas of the country. His proposed solution faces major opposition from his medical colleagues and the health establishment. Dr. Viau knew the proven policy would help alleviate the problem, but he could not find any support. He ran for Dean of the Medical School to begin the reform and did not succeed.

  7. Through this simulation students will experience the policymaking and implementation process firsthand. “Wolf Politics” is intended for use in a public policy- or environmental policy-oriented course. This experience will reinforce the concepts students have learned in their courses, allowing them to apply theoretical knowledge to a real policy issue. The process of preparing testimony for a U.S. Senate subcommittee also gives students a glimpse of how a Senate hearing may operate.

  8. This A and B case sequence traces the development of a nonprofit organization aimed at serving recent Hispanic immigrants in gaining access to day labor and staying out of immigration trouble. Resented in the neighborhood where their job seeking informally took root, the case sequence describes how the Executive Director and key board members worked through internal and external barriers in order to reduce the opposition and establish a presence in this rapidly gentrifying neighborhood of Seattle.

  9. This case focuses on Monty Paradis, a manager charged with overseeing farm worker health and safety, who discovers surprising results in the data he has about a state regulatory program called the Eyes and Falls initiative. This data dispel his previous assumptions, and other results that leave him with more questions than answers. In an effort to rigorously analyze the data on this initiative, he employed regression analysis to determine whether the initiative showed a relative decrease in injuries and costs.

  10. Julie Stewart and her colleagues mobilize the angry and grief stricken families of people incarcerated under mandatory drug sentencing laws. Under these laws, even first-time, non-violent offenders receive extensive prison sentences. The organization brings diverse interests together to change both federal policy and state statutes. Stewart and her colleagues use the following strategies: