Change Management

❕ Notice: New Hallway.org

The Hallway has been completely overhauled! New look, improved functionality, same valuable teaching resources. Visit www.hallway.org to get started with your FREE Pro trial now.

North Point, Maine Police: Tackling Organizational and Community Issues

This case study is about a fictional police department with issues and situations drawn from a number of real-life scenarios faced by police administrators in the United States. The content allows for open discussion about overcoming resistance to change, organizational dynamics, management, communication, and many other public management issues. It is intended to help students develop problem identification, potential solution development, and reflection skills.

Fostering Success? An Equity Initiative Goes Sideways

Early on, conflict emerged. Staff did not understand the purpose of equity training or see the connection to better outcomes for youth in foster care. Some staff voiced concerns about focusing equity solely through the lens of race instead of including multiple marginalized identities. Brooks, kept out of the loop, remained unaware of brewing conflict until it came to a head within the Equity Team. Individuals of color voiced religious (Christian) objections to LGBTQ people, and Brooks had to decide how to respond. In Part B, she replaced equity trainings with emotional intelligence training.

Combat and Collaboration in Seattle's Historic Minimum Wage Debate

This E-PARCC award-winning case, "Combat and Collaboration in Seattle's Historic Minimum Wage Debate”, provides a gripping and vivid example of an innovative policy-making process in a major city. Students are thrust into the action as the Mayor of Seattle struggles to find common ground between the age-old foes of labor and business after creating a committee of stakeholders to design a new minimum wage law. If the Mayor succeeds, Seattle will become the first major city in the country to raise its minimum wage to $15 per hour.

Essential Services at Risk: How Can the Corvallis Crisis Line Survive?

This case follows an ongoing leadership challenge within a small volunteer-dependent non-profit crisis support organization called the Corvallis Crisis Line (CCL), and the impact of poor management on vulnerable agencies. The Corvallis Crisis Line is an anonymous crisis phone line staffed by volunteer community members who participate in extensive training around active listening, appropriate intervention, and service referral for local community resources.

Devising State Policy on Compact Fluorescent Lamps

Consumers have increased their use of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) due to their greater energy efficiency relative to traditional incandescent bulbs. Despite this benefit, CFLs pose potential environmental, health, and safety (EHS) risks due to the presence of mercury within the lamp itself. Without proper handling and disposal, the mercury can be released, with possible health risks to humans. While each CFL has a small amount of mercury, the cumulative environmental and health effects might be significant.

Labeling Nanotech in Food

This cases poses a hypothetical debate over efforts at the U.S. state level to mandate labels on food products containing or packaged in materials containing engineered nanomaterials. As such, it closely mirrors recent debates over labeling foods containing genetically engineered (GE) or genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

The Bedford Falls Academy Charter School

At the beginning of a new school year during the Great Recession, Bedford Falls Academy Executive Director Susan Lundberg proposes an ambitious five-year capital improvement and enrollment growth plan. The plan is a complete surprise to the Board, which had met to discuss the school’s strategy just three months earlier. Over the previous three years the highly leveraged and cash strapped school has purchased a new facility on two hundred acres of property, expanded its enrollment area to surrounding communities, and expanded is programming from grades 5-8 to include grades 9-12.

Bicycling and Coast City

Bicycling and Coast City is a comprehensive case study based upon a fictionalized city on the central coast of a Western state. Following a string of cyclist injuries and casualties along the bustling central corridor of Coast City, city leaders decide that action must be taken to improve the safety and mobility of local cyclists. Part A of the case begins with background information and problem definition, setting the backdrop with vivid detail of Coast City and its various stakeholders and political conflicts.

Rescuing Search and Rescue: A volunteer rescue organization’s struggle with internal tension and the path to organizational competency.

The Utah County Jeep Patrol was tasked by the Sheriff to conduct all search and rescue operations in the County. However, their existing organizational structure and culture was not conducive to the level of service required by the search and rescue demands. As newer, more enthusiastic members joined the team, they realized a change was needed. The new members attempted to inspire this change within the existing organization and after a long and arduous process they ultimately failed.

A New System for the Office of Child Welfare

In a mid-sized U.S. county, children’s lives are lost and the local Office of Child Welfare finds its own information management practices to be implicated in the tragedy. Lucinda Angle, the county executive, is determined to improve the office’s information systems. She soon discovers that managing child welfare data also requires taking into account the data requirements and systems belonging to stakeholders at the state and federal levels as well. Angle and her senior staff issue a Request for Information (RFI) to seek ideas from software vendors on building a new system.