Transportation

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Bicycling and Coast City

Bicycling and Coast City is a comprehensive case study based upon a fictionalized city on the central coast of a Western state. Following a string of cyclist injuries and casualties along the bustling central corridor of Coast City, city leaders decide that action must be taken to improve the safety and mobility of local cyclists. Part A of the case begins with background information and problem definition, setting the backdrop with vivid detail of Coast City and its various stakeholders and political conflicts.

The Case of the South Park Bridge: Infrastructure Concerns and Community Resilience in Seattle

On a Tuesday evening in April 2010, South Park residents and local business owners gathered at the local Machinists Union Hall to hear King County representatives make a surprising and disheartening announcement: the South Park Bridge would close. The bridge was the main link between the largely low-income and industrial neighborhood of South Park and downtown Seattle, and supported traffic flow onto the main retail corridor in South Park. This traffic provided much of the customer base on which the small businesses depended almost entirely.

NAIROBI: FIGHTING BLACKOUTS IN A GROWING URBAN CENTER

The case discusses the acceptance and implementation of the Nairobi Metropolitan Transmission Ring (NMR) as one solution to address Kenya’s electricity supply issues. The NMR project required the balancing of multiple influencing parties to satisfy national development criteria, highlighted by Kenya’s Vision 2030, with multilateral financing prerequisites. While the case focuses on decisions made at a national level for development within one city, it addresses public and private concerns, individual and national economics, income inequality, environmental externalities, and rural vs.

En Route To Cleaner Air: Urban air pollution management in Santiago, Chile

Santiago suffers from a serious air pollution problem. With six million people, a third of the country’s population, in a bowl surrounded by the Andes, air quality is among the worst in the world. Two major sources of airborne particulates were exhaust from cars and buses.

Defining Sustainability in the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy

Chief Minister Taib has set in place a massive sustainable dam project (SCORE) to increase energy production throughout Malaysia and develop Sarawak’s economy by bringing foreign industrial investment to the area. The SCORE project dams have been qualified as sustainable by the International Hydropower Association’s (IHA) Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Forum, and construction on the Murum Dam, the third of a potential 12 dams, was completed in 2013.

Cities in Flux: Urban Redensification in Detroit and Guangzhou

A shrinking Detroit and an expanding Guangzhou shape this case, which aims to introduce readers to the nuances of population density and the importance of redensification in sustainable urban planning. Redensification policies in these cities offer a novel way of thinking about how to distribute populations and jobs to optimize public services and a city’s quality of life.

Leaning into the Wind: Building Sustainable Wind Power in China

In China’s 12th Five Year Plan (2011-2015), the central government outlines ambitious targets for expanding domestic wind power generation. These targets are part of the government’s greater effort to reduce reliance upon thermal plants, which have produced unprecedented levels of pollution in recent years. As the world’s largest wind power collective, which is expected to reach 40 GW in capacity by 2020, the Jiuquan Wind Power Base serves as a paragon of China’s unbridled expansion into renewables.

Maboneng: Place of Light. A Case Study in Urban Regeneration in Johannesburg, South Africa

Until the 1970s, Johannesburg’s Central Business District (CBD) was the economic center of South Africa and, arguably, of the entire African continent. In the 1980s, however, a series of events and an epidemic of violence led to a mass exodus from the CBD to Johannesburg’s safer northern suburbs. The CBD became a virtual ‘no-go’ zone and quickly lost its significance as the center of Johannesburg. The city shifted to a decentralized sprawl and the CBD fell into a state of abandoned disrepair.

Regularization of Illegal Electricity Consumers: Non-Technical Loss Rates in Rio de Janeiro

Electricity theft represents a major problem in developing, emerging and even developed countries. This case study focuses on Rio de Janeiro, a city that is growing rapidly yet is also struggling to overcome basic challenges in the electricity sector. Known formally as non-technical losses, electricity theft and electricity fraud have contributed to a precarious situation in Rio de Janeiro in which regularized consumers effectively pay increased tariffs to compensate for high electricity theft levels.

São Paulo’s Water Scarcity: 45 Days ‘Til Empty

The Brazilian city of São Paulo, capital of the State of São Paulo and Brazil’s largest metropolitan area, currently faces its most severe drought in decades. The drought, coupled with extreme heat, population growth and urbanization, has stressed water resources from the Cantareira water system, which serves more than half of the metro area. Water levels in the system have sunk to 16 percent of the system’s capacity. Available water supply from the system is expected to continue to decrease with the arrival of the dry season in April.